Past Webinars and Trainings

CJJ offers numerous training and technical assistance opportunities at national and regional conferences, during webinars and live chats, and through technical assistance programs. Included below are resources and materials from webinars we have completed in 2016 and 2017. You can access our webinar archive for the webinars held in 20132014, and 2015.


Ensuring Equity: LGBQ/GNCT Youth and the Juvenile Justice System 

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, questioning, gender nonconforming and transgender (LGBQ/GNCT) youth are overrepresented in the juvenile justice system. Nationwide, 7-9% of youth identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, however, 20% of youth incarcerated identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual. Additionally, about 40% of girls incarcerated identify as such. LGBQ/GNCT youth have less protective and more risk factors than their heterosexual and cisgender peers.  

Ceres Policy Research is currently leading a national initiative that trains youth justice jurisdictions on how to incorporate questions about sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression into their case management systems.  They have trained multiple sites in Ohio, New York, and Connecticut. 

On November 13th, presenters shared new data about the LGBQ/GNCT youth involved in these juvenile justice systems, identifying the specific locations in the system where they are the most overrepresented. Attendees learned about the intersection of juvenile justice and youth who identify as LGBQ/GNCT, successful state and local programs that address this population, and how provisions in the JJDPA should be applied in an equitable way for all youth.

Presenters: 
Dr. Angela Irvine, Principal, Ceres Policy Research
Aisha Canfield, Director, Ceres Policy Research


Understanding the JJDPA: Enhancing System Partnerships for Successful Educational Reentry 

Part 8 of Understanding the JJDPA: A Webinar Series on the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act

Large numbers of youth are pushed out of schools and into the justice system fueling inequalities based on race, gender, perceived sexual orientation, and disability. Additionally, system-involved youth do not have the same access to quality education as their non-incarcerated peers. The 2018 reauthorization of the JJDPA includes important new protections for youth in the juvenile justice system to support their reentry to school, including timely transfers of education records, partial or full credit for coursework completed while in custody, and ensuring those credits count towards high school graduation. On October 23rd, presenters discussed the JJDPA and Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) educational requirements for youth involved in the justice system and provided examples of state programs that have successful educational reentry programs. 

Presenters: 
Reynelle Brown Staley, Policy Director, Education Law Center
Nadia Mozaffar, Staff Attorney, Juvenile Law Center 

Click here for the Powerpoint presentation.


Reentry Planning: Supporting Youth as They Transition Back to Their Community

Part 7 of Understanding the JJDPA: A Webinar Series on the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act

Youth who come into contact with the juvenile justice system can experience numerous barriers when transitioning back into their communities, including obtaining employment; securing stable, safe and affordable housing; and transferring school credits. The 2018 reauthorization of the JJDPA sets out, for the first time, language related to reentry plans for youth who are returning to the community. On August 15, presenters discussed the new JJDPA reentry requirements, how states can work with youth, families, schools, businesses and community-based organizations when planning for reentry, and provided examples of successful programs.

Presenters:
Andrew Palomo, Director of Community Strategies, National Network for Youth
Lisa Pilnik, Senior Advisor, Coalition for Juvenile Justice
Ruth Rovezzi, Deputy Commissioner for Operations, Department of Youth Services, Massachusetts

Click here for the Powerpoint presentation.


Understanding the JJDPA: Girls and Sexually Exploited Youth in the Juvenile Justice System

Part 6 of Understanding the JJDPA: A Webinar Series on the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act

Girls are disproportionately involved in the justice system for offenses that present little or no threat to public safety. The vast majority of girls who enter the justice system have experienced trauma, including sexual, physical, and emotional abuse. For almost three decades, the JJDPA has required states to develop gender-specific policies for their juvenile justice system. The 2018 reauthorization expands upon those requirements, including eliminating the use of restraints on known pregnant youth and providing alternatives to detention for survivors of commercial sexual exploitation. On July 11th, Dr. Washington and Cherice Hopkins discussed the changes in H.R. 6964 that affect girls and sexually exploited youth in the justice system and how states can continue to work towards addressing the unique needs of this population.

Presenters: 
K. Shakira Washington, Ph.D., MPA, Vice President, National Crittenton
Cherice Hopkins, Staff Attorney, Rights4Girls

Click here for the PowerPoint presentation. 


Shifting from Disproportionate Minority Contact to Racial and Ethnic Disparities

Part 5 of Understanding the JJDPA: A Webinar Series on the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act

Under the JJDPA, states are required to assess and address racial and ethnic disparities at key points in the juvenile justice system – from arrest to detention to confinement. Studies indicate that youth of color receive tougher sentences and are more likely to be incarcerated than white youth for the same offenses. With youth of color comprising one-third of the youth population but two-thirds of youth in contact with the juvenile justice system, this provision requires states and local jurisdictions to create action plans to address disparities within their systems. On May 16, Naomi Smoot, Craig Hargrow, and Trista Dame discussed how states can shift from Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) to Racial and Ethnic Disparities, and provided examples of how states are addressing racial and ethnic disparities. 

Presenters: 
Craig Hargrow, CJJ National DMC Coordinator, Deputy Executive Director of Juvenile Justice/Second Look, Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth
Trista Deame, Race Equity Coordinator, Office of Youth Justice, New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services
Naomi Smoot, Executive Director, Coalition for Juvenile Justice

Click here for the PowerPoint Presentation. 


Sight and Sound Separation and Adult Jail Removal

Part 4 of Understanding the JJDPA: A Webinar Series on the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act

Research shows youth confined in adult jails and lockups are more likely to come back into contact with the system and that, while confined, are at high risk for suffering assault and committing suicide. On April 18, Rachel Marshall and Neelum Arya explained how the 2018 JJDPA Reauthorization extends the jail removal and sight and sound core requirements, the strategies states are using to ensure youth are not placed in and removed from adult facilities, and policy recommendations moving forward. This webinar discussed Neelum's recent report Getting to Zero: A 50-State Study of Strategies to Remove Youth from Adult Jails

Presenters: 
Rachel Marshall, Federal Policy Counsel, Campaign for Youth Justice
Neelum Arya, Author, Getting to Zero: A 50-State Study of Strategies to Remove Youth from Adult Jails

Click here for the PowerPoint Presentation. 


Status Offenses and Valid Court Orders

Part 3 of Understanding the JJDPA: A Webinar Series on the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act

On March 21,  Meg Williams and Diane Fox discussed research that was conducted in Colorado to better understand the outcomes for truants who have been detained and the action steps the Division of Criminal Justice and the JJDP Council (State Advisory Group) have taken to change their state policies. Additionally, Naomi Smoot and Lisa Pilnik addressed the changes to the Deinstitutionalization of Status Offenders (DSO) core protection and the additional requirements for the VCO exception under H.R. 6964, as well as best practices for addressing status offense behaviors.

Presenters: 
Diane Fox, Principle, Infinite Frontier Consulting, LLC
Lisa Pilnik, Senior Consultant, Coalition for Juvenile Justice 
Naomi Smoot, Executive Director, Coalition for Juvenile Justice 
Meg Williams, Juvenile Justice Specialist, Colorado

Click here for the PowerPoint presentation. 


Developing State and Tribal Partnerships

Part 2 of Understanding the JJDPA: A Webinar Series on the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act

The reauthorization of the JJDPA includes a requirement for State Advisory Groups to include membership from a Tribal representative in states where Indian Tribes are located.  This new requirement highlights the importance of developing collaborative partnerships between states and Tribes. On February 21, Alan Miller and Will Edmo discussed the critical issues in relationship-building between state and Tribal governments and shared their insights on the partnerships built in Idaho. 

Presenters: 
Alan Miller, Juvenile Justice Specialist & DMC Coordinator, Idaho 
Will Edmo III, Tribal Public Defender, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes

Click here for the PowerPoint presentation. 


What's Next: H. 6964 and the Reauthorization of JJDPA

Part 1 of Understanding the JJDPA: A Webinar Series on the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act

For the first time in 16 years, Congress has updated and reauthorized the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act. On January 29, lead advocates provided an overview of what's included in H.R. 6964, and how it changes the Act's core requirements. 

Presenters: 
Naomi Smoot, Executive Director, Coalition for Juvenile Justice and Co-Chair of Act4JJ
Marcy Mistrett, CEO, Campaign for Youth Justice and Co-Chair of Act4JJ
Rachel Marshall, Policy Counsel, Campaign for Youth Justice

Click here for a recording of this webinar and here for the PowerPoint presentation. 

For additional resources and more tool to help understand H.R. 6964, visit CJJ and Act4JJ resource pages. 


Debtor's Prison for Kids: Fines and Fees in the Juvenile Justice System

Approximately 1 million youth appear in juvenile court in the United States each year. In every state youth and their families face a myriad of different legal costs including fees, fines, and restitution. One particularly problematic cost is the cost of court-appointed counsel--40 states have laws requiring children or their parents to pay for appointed counsel, in some cases even if they have been found indigent. On January 22, the Juvenile Law Center provided background on the types of costs youth face in the juvenile justice system, highlighting the cost of court-appointed legal assistance, the long-term financial and legal consequences of such costs, and reform efforts that can ensure all kids have access to justice, regardless of their financial circumstances. 

Presenters include: 
Jessica Feierman, Senior Director, Juvenile Law Center 
Nadia Mozaffar, Staff Attorney, Juvenile Law Center 
Marcía Hopkins, Senior Manager, Youth Advocacy Programs and Policy, Juvenile Law Center 
Shyara Hill, Intern, Youth Advocacy Program, Juvenile Law Center 

Click here for the PowerPoint presentation. 


Addressing the Intersection of Juvenile Justice and the Opioid Epidemic with Multisystemic Therapy (MST)

On December 12, Lori Moore and Logan Greenspan of MST Services discussed the intersection of the opioid epidemic with the juvenile justice and child protective systems and how prevention strategies and clinically proven interventions, such as Multisystemic Therapy (MST), can work together to help reduce substance abuse among youth and caregivers. 

Presenters include: 

Lori Moore, Vice President and Manager of Network Partnership of MST Services
Logan Greenspan, Managing Director of MST Services

Click here for the PowerPoint presentation. 


Emerging Leaders Present: Adolescent Brain Development

This webinar was part of the ongoing series featuring members of CJJ’s Emerging Leaders Committee

On November 7, Nicholas Turco, a member of CJJ’s 2018 Emerging Leaders Committee, discussed his personal research on how trauma affects adolescent brain development. He explained the development of a young person's brain, how trauma affects the developing brain, and his ideas on how to support youth who have survived complex trauma and help them transition out of the juvenile justice system. 

Presenters include: 
Nicholas Turco, Member of CJJ's Emerging Leaders Committee

Click here for the PowerPoint presentation.


Measuring Educational Opportunity in Juvenile Justice Schools

Education programs in secure facilities are not as good as they need to be, and many systems do not have strong data collection practices in place to inform strong policy and program decision-making. On October 31, Hailly T. N. Korman and Max Marchitello of Bellwether Education Partners provided an overview of their new report, Measuring Educational Opportunity in Juvenile Justice Schools. This report is a first-of-its-kind comprehensive analysis of education data for juvenile justice facilities in every state. This webinar addressed the research methods, the conclusions reached, and the known limitations of the existing data, as well as the future of this data collection and analysis. 

Presenters: 

Hailly T. N. Korman, Senior Associate Partner of Bellwether Education Partners

Max Marchitello, Senior Analyst of Bellwether Education Partners


Click here for the PowerPoint presentation.


Advocating for Trafficked Girls by Disrupting the Abuse to Prison Pipeline

On September 26, Cherice Hopkins and Rebecca Burney of Rights4Girls provided an overview of domestic child sex trafficking and discussed how girls are often criminalized for experiencing sexual violence. Additionally, the webinar addressed how being a trafficking survivor impacts a girl pre- and post-justice involvement and identified strategies to reduce reliance on the justice system as a response to girls' trauma.

Presenters:

Click here for the PowerPoint presentation.


Gender, Sexuality, and the Juvenile Justice System: Promoting System Improvement

On August 28, Giovanna Taormina and Kiku Johnson of One Circle Foundation discussed their organization's two nationally recognized, research-based, gender responsive support group models - Girls Circle® and The Council for Boys and Young Men®. The webinar explains the two models' evidence-based outcomes, successful implementation guidelines, and resources including training, manual-guided curriculum, and Q&A tools. 

Presenters: 

Click here for the PowerPoint presentation. 


Noncitizen Youth in the Juvenile Justice System

On June 14, Angie Junck and Rachel Prandini of the Immigrant Legal Resource Center discussed the immigration consequences of delinquency, and provided policy guidance on affirmative steps advocates can take to assist noncitizen youth facing delinquency proceedings. This webinar also detailed important areas of intersection between state and federal law, such as confidentiality of juvenile records. 

Presenters:

Click here for a recording of this webinar and click here for the PowerPoint presentation.


Evidence-Based Programs: The Four Biggest Lessons Learned from Statewide Adoptions of EBPs for System-involved Youth & Families

This webinar features the award-winning Juvenile Justice Incentive Grant Program administered by the Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council (CJCC) in partnership with the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice and Evidence-Based Associates (EBA). 

Presenters:

  •  Joe Vignati, Georgia DJJ Deputy Director
  • Nicole Janer 
  • Dan Edwards

Click here for the PowerPoint Presentation and click here for the recording 


Racial Equity in the Juvenile Justice System: Kentucky Strategies to Reduce DMC

Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) refers to the disproportionate number of youth of color who come into contact with the juvenile justice system. Disproportionate minority representation is evident at nearly every contact point within the juvenile justice system continuum: Youth of color are more likely to be arrested, more likely to receive longer sentences, and more likely to be placed in restrictive confinement than their white peers who engage in the same or similar behaviors. 

On Wednesday, April 18, this webinar highlighted the importance of using data to inform juvenile justice reform efforts regarding (DMC). 

It also provided an overview of one Kentucky Agency’s attempt to address DMC through strategic planning, racial equity assessment, and a training agenda that addresses the issues revealed through the assessment. Participants left with a clearer sense of how to identify contact points and community stakeholders in order to address DMC. 

Presenters:

Click here for the webinar recording. Click here for the PowerPoint presentation. 


Filling the Gaps: Promoting a Developmentally Appropriate, Trauma-informed Approach to Policing

Nationally, law enforcement officers are not adequately trained in key information necessary to dealing competently and effectively with youth - including disproportionate minority contact. Forty-five states offer no model policies to guide law enforcement officers’ and agencies’ interactions with youth. Most juvenile justice reform efforts focus on changing systems that address youth after the point of arrest. These factors help explain why the largest point of racial disparity occurs at the point of arrest, and is hard to decrease as youth go deeper and deeper into the system.

On Thursday, March 29 participants heard from Lisa Thurau, Chief Executive Officer and Executive Director at Strategies for Youth, and Andrew Smith, New Hampshire State DMC Coordinator and CJJ Ethnic and Cultural Diversity Chair, about the vital role advocates can play in filling these gaps.

The webinar showcased initiatives state advocates are implementing to address law enforcement’s role in improving the effectiveness of the juvenile justice system, by adopting developmentally-appropriate, trauma-informed equitable approaches to policing youth.

Presenters:

  • Lisa Thurau, Chief Executive Officer and Executive Director at Strategies for Youth
  • Andrew Smith, CJJ Ethnic and Cultural Diversity Chair


Click here for the webinar recording. Click here for the PowerPoint presentation. 


Big Data Policing: Its Impact on Children and Youth

Technology is changing how law enforcement does their job. The goal is to create systems that are race neutral and objective, but is that how things are playing out in our communities?

On Thursday, Feb. 15 participants heard from Andrew Ferguson, author of "The Rise of Big Data Policing: Surveillance, Race, and the Future of Law Enforcement" about the implications that technology can have on racial and ethnic disparities for youth and young adults in our justice systems. 

The webinar highlighted the importance of viewing surveillance as a civil rights issue, demonstrated how implicit bias can impact the way new technology is applied, and emphasized the need for democratic community education around big data.

Presenters:

  • Andrew Ferguson, Researcher, Professor, and Author of "The Rise of Big Data Policing: Surveillance, Race, and the Future of Law Enforcement"


Click here for the webinar recording. Click here for the PowerPoint presentation. 


Collaborating for Change: Addressing Youth Homelessness and Juvenile Justice

The problem of youth homelessness is one that frequently goes unnoticed. National estimates indicate that in a given year, 380,000 minors will at some point be homeless and alone, without the accompaniment of their family.

Children experiencing homelessness are often criminalized as a result of behaviors that stem from their lack of safe and secure housing. Likewise, involvement in the juvenile justice system can also result in homelessness. Interviews by the Administration for Children and Families of youth age 14-21 from across the country and found that almost 44% of young people experiencing homelessness had been in a juvenile detention center, jail, or prison.

On Tuesday, Feb. 28 participants had the chance to learn about ways that community collaborations between service providers, cities and government agencies, schools, and other key stakeholders can help ensure that youth are not criminalized because they experience homelessness, and that they do not become homeless as a result of their involvement with the juvenile justice system. The webinar highlighted key policy recommendations from a new report released by the Coalition for Juvenile Justice in partnership with the National Network for Youth and the National League of Cities' Institute for Youth, Education, and Families. The project was made possible through funding from the Raikes Foundation, the Tow Foundation, and the Melville Charitable Trust.

This webinar was co-hosted by the National Network for Youth, and the National League of Cities' Institute for Youth, Education, and Families.

Presenters:

  • Darla Bardine, Executive Director, National Network for Youth
  • Laura Furr, Program Manager, Justice Reform and Youth Engagement, for the National League of Cities' Institute for Youth, Education, and Families
  • Lisa Pilnik, Senior Advisor, Coalition for Juvenile Justice


Slides from this webinar are available here


 

Collaborating for Change: Coming Together to Address the Intersection of Juvenile Justice and Youth Homelessness

Each year, an estimated 380,000 children below the age of 18 are alone, without their families or a place to call home. Many of these children will come into contact with the juvenile justice system. Interviews with 654 runaway and homeless youth revealed that nearly 44 percent had stayed in a jail, prison, or juvenile detention facility, and nearly 78 percent had at least one previous interaction with law enforcement. 

On July 13, CJJ held a webinar on "Collaborating for Change: Coming Together to Address the Intersection of Juvenile Justice and Homelessness." Participants learned more about the ways communities can work together to identify and assist unaccompanied homeless children. Presenters also discussed the important role that collaboration plays in addressing the intersection of homelessness and juvenile justice. 


Speakers included: 


Click here for the webinar recording. Click here for the PowerPoint presentation. 


Addressing the Housing Needs of Youth and Young Adults in Contact with the Justice System

Youth and young adults in contact with the juvenile and adult criminal justice systems experience numerous barriers to securing stable, safe, and affordable housing. Many are disengaged from their families or have histories of abuse and other traumas, putting them at a greater risk of homelessness. Youth and young adults involved in the justice system often have mental health and substance use issues, which can present further challenges to securing housing.

CJJ and the National Reentry Resource Center held a webinar on June 30 on: "Addressing the Housing Needs of Youth and Young Adults in Contact with the Justice System." During this webinar, participants learned about:

  • Current data and trends on youth and young adult homelessness;
  • How homelessness intersects with the juvenile and adult criminal justice systems; and
  • Lessons learned and promising strategies to connect youth and young adults in contact with the justice system to safe, stable, and affordable housing.


Presenters included:


Click here for the webinar recording. Click here to view the PowerPoint.  


Gault at 50: Ensuring Counsel for LGBTQ Youth in the Juvenile Justice System

Access to counsel for children means more than representation in court. It means having an advocate who will value clients’ stories, hear their concerns, and fight for fair and equitable outcomes throughout the entirety of the case. The attorney-client relationship is especially important for LGBTQ youth, who may be struggling with difficult and deeply personal situations at home, school, or in their communities. During Pride Month, we honored the progress of the LGBTQ advocacy movement, but we must also work to lift up the voices of LGBTQ youth too often stifled in our courtrooms and in our prisons. 

On June 29, CJJ hosted a webinar on “Gault at 50: Ensuring Counsel for LGBTQ Youth in the Juvenile Justice System.” This webinar provided an overview of the National Juvenile Defender Center’s Gault at 50 Campaign and the issues young people face accessing counsel and other due process protections. Attendees learned more about the latest research on the criminalization of LGBTQ youth from the Movement Advancement Project. Presenters also shared information and recommendations on how attorneys and other juvenile justice stakeholders can ensure the promise of Gault is met for LGBTQ youth around the country.

Presenters included: 


Click here for the recording. Click here for the PowerPoint presentation. 


Electronic Monitoring of Youth in Trouble with the Law: A Reassessment

Electronic monitoring of youth in the juvenile justice system has become increasingly commonplace, with little to no regulation or oversight. However, it raises significant concerns, including: the possibility of net widening; severe deprivations of liberty for youth; racially-biased application; and little research to support its efficacy. 

On June 23, CJJ and the National Juvenile Justice Network co-hosted a webinar on, "Electronic Monitoring of Youth in Trouble with the Law: A Reassessment." During the webinar, presenters reexamined the use of electronic monitoring and discussed whether it should be viewed more as a form of punishment than as an alternative to incarceration. The presentation drew on research and analysis done by Kate Weisburd, director of the Youth Defender Clinic, which is affiliated with U.C. Berkeley Law School, and the first-hand experiences of electronic monitoring shared by two young advocates with the Anti-Recidivism Coalition.

Presenters included: 


Click here to view the recording. Click here to view the PowerPoint presentation. 


Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Education and the Juvenile Justice System

All too often youth come into contact with the juvenile justice system based upon behaviors that happen while they are at school. But what happens when these behaviors stem from an unmet or undiagnosed need stemming from the student's intellectual or developmental disability? CJJ held a webinar on May 27 where participants learned more about ways in which students can be pushed out of their schools, the rights that students with special needs have when these situations arise, and how communities can eliminate unnecessary referrals to the juvenile justice system. 

Presenters included: 

  • Selene Almazan, Legal Director, Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates 
  • Diane Smith Howard, Senior Staff Attorney, National Disability Rights Network 


Click here to view the recording. Click here to view the PowerPoint presentation.


Civics 101: How Congress Works & How You Can Exercise Your Right to Advocate

CJJ held a webinar on "Civics 101: How Congress Works & How You Can Exercise Your Right to Advocate" on March 16. This webinar, hosted by CJJ's Government Relations Committee, gave a refresher course on how a bill becomes a law. Speakers responded to the following questions: 

  • What must happen between a bill’s introduction and the president’s signature?

  • What role can individuals and organizations play along the way?
  • What are the steps in the legislative process?
  • What is the difference between advocacy and lobbying?


Presenters included: 

  • Jill Ward, Federal Policy Consultant, Campaign for Youth Justice  
  • Derek Lawlor, Associate, Covington and Burling LLP


Click here to view the presentation. 


Youth with Intellectual and Development Disabilities in Juvenile Justice

Studies estimate 65-70% of youth involved with the juvenile justice system meet the requirements for a disability. However, juvenile justice systems often lack adequate strategies and processes to identify and serve these young people.

CJJ held a webinar on "Youth with Intellectual and Development Disabilities in Juvenile Justice" on February 16.

This webinar provided an overview of the issues that youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities experience in the juvenile justice system. Participants unpacked how intellectual and developmental disabilities can affect behavior, how those behaviors are perceived, and how such perceptions can increase risk for system involvement. The webinar introduced strategies for communities to better identify disabilities. It also focused on how to meet the needs of this specific population within the system, from diversion, to improving conditions within confinement, and preparing them for success upon release.

Presenters included:


Click here to watch a recording of the webinar. Click here for the PowerPoint presentation, which includes a transcript. You can also view the following resources from the webinar: